Thursday, August 24, 2006

Analysis and Evaluation next phase for OIL

The next phase for the Analysis and Evaluation Group for OIL (online information literacy) eCDF project was brainstormed today.

We did this after we finished the second presentation to research forums at both the polytechnic and the university (21 August and 24 August) to inform people about the evaluation processes which have taken place over the first year of the project. In particular, the presentations were to inform audiences about the findings of the research evaluation project - Real use research evaluation of an online essay writing module: In formation literacy eLearning modules project. The audiences at both venues were relatively small with approximately 15 at each event.

Brainstorm of ideas for the next phase of evaluation
1. Which modules from phase one do we need to test for usability?
  • Business report - scheduled for 1 September 0800 - 1000 in computer lab H517. M and I and myself plus D has volunteered to help as well. This could be usability testing and not part of the research project.
  • Science report - will not be used in class this year, but could be randomly used by second year students if they are referred to it by their lecturer. R wants to customise the module for first year students using the online editor. Then integrate it in the first year biology course in 2007. This would be ideal for the research project. Also D to get Rosemary to review the module for the Science Investigation - expert review.
  • NZ Information Sources
  • - review Leitesha and Joseph modules, also review modules with Learning Centre students and staff at university and polytechnic - usability testing.
2. Which modules to be investigated as part of the research project?
Depending on the research design, expert review and use of the online editor for customisation could be incorporated in the research. Also real use with students in class and critique of the modules by users early October). Observation, focus group interviews (record and transcribe) and questionnaire testing of usability will still be used as methods for collecting data when in real use. Also a feedback blog could be set up for participants to add their feedback. Staff who participate in customisation of the modules would be asked to keep a log of the process, and be interviewed in a focus group. This would comprise case study research.
  • Science report - as above.
  • Essay writing
  • - M wishes to customise this module for a foundation course.
  • Digital Information Literacy
  • - expert review & consultation - FLNW** conference visitors - this module and others.
  • Maori & Pasifika
  • - expert review & consultation - ongoing consultation
  • Ethics - expert review & consultation - copyright expert
  • Searching - expert review
  • Evaluation - expert review
  • Springboard (introduction to IL) module - expert review
Need to make modifications to the questionnaire (remove irrelevant features), information sheet and consent form. Also the feedback sheet on the OIL website needs to be modified to collect feedback. If we add an information sheet and include the consent on the questionnaire, then people critiquing the modules of the OIL site could be included in the research project.
  • Expert review will also be obtained re ANZIIL standards.
  • Notify college research office about changes in methodology - information sheet, consent form, questionnaire, research design.

Methods for disseminating modules
  • Add OIL link to institutional websites
  • Training in online editor - introduce mid-September with Terry Stewart eCDF project - inhouse group training first from 4 September when usernames and passwords issued.
  • Google not picking up site.
  • ITPNZ, DEANZ, FLLinNZ, eLearning Directors notified
**FLNW = Future of Learning in a Networked World

Sunday, August 13, 2006

Digital information literacy

I have to prepare an outline for an online module on digital information literacy for the eCDF OIL project.

Digital information literacy is also called fluency, and I like the definition I found on the 21st Century information fluency project website.
This site also has micromodules - small tutorials about information literacy.

Digital Information Fluency (DIF) is the ability to find, evaluate and use digital information effectively, efficiently and ethically. DIF involves knowing how digital information is different from print information; having the skills to use specialized tools for finding digital information; and developing the dispositions needed in the digital information environment.

As well as the definition there is a useful diagram.

Therefore in a module geared up to help users gain skills in digital information literacy, the following needs to be covered:
  • Language and the meaning of terms used for digital searching e.g. subscription-based and free networked datasets, networked information - abstracting and indexing services, full-text material and digitised collections, access points, interfaces, search syntaxes
  • Terms used for digital material e.g. learning objects, resource-based, multimedia etc
  • Range of interfaces for accessing digital information - databases, datasets, electronic libraries, Internet, other multimedia - problem-solving so users can navigate sources and understand their scope
  • Formats of digital information - text, audio, video, images, blogs, wikis etc.
  • Portals, search engines, RSS feeds, subject gateway - catalogue, or directory, of internet resources e.g. OMNI Examples of several subject gateways via the OMNI website plus Internet tutorials on how to find information effectively and Internet detective.
  • Resource Discovery Network (RDN) and web collections and sub-collections e.g. JISC collections
  • Digital repositories e.g. OSLOR, Aeshare, Australian Flexible framework toolboxes
  • FOSS (free and open source software) - examples relevant to information literacy e.g. Diigo ( a web-based annotating tool), blogger, google etc.
  • Digital tools for searching - search engines, subject directories, gateways etc.
  • Data sets e.g. Citation Index, databases, data centres
  • Examples of online resources e.g. NZ National library, British library online gallery - world's oldest printed book "Diamond Sutra", wikipedia
  • Publishing on the web, digital publications
  • Intellectual property and options for copyright - creative commons, JISC models, copyright licensing Ltd.
This module will need to be linked to search strategies, evaluating and ethics modules.

References

Blackall, L. (2005). Digital literacy: how it affects teaching practices and networked learning futures _ a proposal for action research. The Knowedge Tree, Edition 07.

Breaks, M. & MacLeod, R. (2001).
Joining up the academic
information landscape:
the role of the RDN hubs within the Distributed National Electronic Resource.

21st Century information fluency project

Tuesday, August 08, 2006

initial planning FLLinNZ third round

Our planning session for the Flexible Learning leaders in New Zealand planning meeting all the 1st and 2nd round FLLinNZers gathered at Wiapuna Hotel at Mt Wellington, Auckland. We started with a warmup and a discussion of what we are expecting from the third round of funding and any issues. The facilitator presented on the situation in Australia.

Main points were:

  • competency-based apprenticeships
  • qualifications recognised across Aus
  • maximum flexibility in system - impacts on quality
  • grow private training orgs with effective competition
  • school-based apprenticeships
  • RPL - want to improve uptake
  • industry wants to control knowledge base - web 2 does not fit
  • training providers not keeping pace with rapid technological change - important
  • costs, flexibility and access
  • need training to meet needs of lifelong learners - skills shortages, shiftworkers, contractors, mature learners, just-in-time and to suit learners
  • need to build capability - respond to physical and online environment
    changing role of education and training

key activity: who can we connect with to make the most influence?
often fail to equip people with skills to be able to problem solve and think forthemselves.

Pedagogical shifts

  • more of the following:
  • distributed networks
  • social networking
  • blended and flexible models
  • facilitation driving pedagogy not instruction
  • innovation
  • market changes e.g. full employment
  • Less occurrence of the teacher teaching many.

Examples: Motor Traders Association - mp3 audio files used in training to capture their interest

Caryl Oliver - mlearning - there is a recording of an interview with Caryl.
Manager of 2020: multigenerations, longer later, more teams, flexible working, performance emphasised, innovation

Overview of pressures on the NZ tertiary education sector can be seen on the concept map (to be loaded).


Facilitator talked about Australian Flexible Framework and how we could have links with Australian projects. Learnscope and Knowledge tree online journal. eLearning networks project is running a September Online Event: Tapping into Resources for E-learning 6 - 8 September 2006

Brainstorm ideas
Pictures of brainstorming outcomes can be seen in large size by clicking on photos.

Monday, August 07, 2006

FLLinNZ meeting

Our planning session for the Flexible Learning leaders in New Zealand planning meeting all the 1st and 2nd round FLLinNZers gathered at Wiapuna Hotel at Mt Wellington, Auckland. We started with a warmup and a discussion of what we are expecting from the third round of funding and any issues.

The facilitator presented on the situation in Australia. Main points were:
  • competency-based apprenticeships
  • qualifications recognised across Aus
  • maximum flexibility in system - impacts on quality
  • grow private training orgs with effective competition
  • school-based apprenticeships
  • RPL - want to improve uptake
  • industry wants to control knowledge base - web 2 does not fit
  • training providers not keeping pace with rapid technological change - important
  • costs, flexibility and access
  • need training to meet needs of lifelong learners - skills shortages, shiftworkers, contractors, mature learners, just-in-time and to suit learners
  • need to build capability - respond to physical and online environment
  • changing role of education and training

key activity: who can we connect with to make the most influence?

often fail to equip people with skills to be able to problem solve and think forthemselves.

Pedagogical shifts

  • more of the following:
  • distributed networks
  • social networking
  • blended and flexible models
  • facilitation driving pedagogy not instruction
  • innovation
  • market changes e.g. full employment

Less occurrence of the teacher teaching many.

Examples: Motor Traders Association - mp3 audio files used in training to capture their interest

Caryl Oliver - mlearning - there is a recording of an interview with Caryl.

Manager of 2020: multigenerations, longer later, more teams, flexible working, performance emphasised, innovation

Overview of pressures on the NZ tertiary education sector can be seen on the concept map (to be loaded).

Facilitator talked about Australian Flexible Framework and how we could have links with Australian projects. Learnscope and Knowledge tree online journal. eLearning networks project is running a September Online Event: Tapping into Resources for E-learning 6 - 8 September 2006

Brainstorm ideas

Pictures of brainstorming outcomes can be seen in large size by clicking on photos.